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Working As A Doctor Or Director May Give Better Protection From Dementia Than Driving A Bus

Doctors revealed that doing more cognitively motivating occupations may delay the onset of dementia. According to a recent survey, individuals who work in cognitively stimulating occupations have a lower risk of dementia in old age than those who work in less enjoyable occupations.

Experts believe that working as a fruit picker, bank teller, or vehicle driver offers far less psychological stimulation to help prevent dementia than operating as a physician, barrister, or corporate leader. They discovered that individuals with uninteresting occupations had a 50% greater risk of dementia than those who were interested in their careers.


7.3 individuals per 100,000 develop dementia among those who have "low mental stimulation" at work. According to the survey, the percentage of those in high-stimulation professions was 4.8 per 100,000.

"Our observations confirm the theory that cognitive stimulation in adulthood may delay the onset of dementia," said Professor Mika.

"We discovered that the rates of dementia observed at age 80 in individuals who had received elevated levels of cognitive stimulation were already present at age 78.3 in those who had received low levels of cognitive stimulation."


This implies that the average postponement of illness onset is around a year and a half, but there is likely significant variability in the impacts between people. " He said that individuals who function as senior civil officials, editors, solicitors, or barristers have professions that are considered to be among the most satisfying.

Driving shuttles and vehicles, metalwork, reservation clerks, agricultural work, and cashiers were among the jobs with the lowest levels of mental stimulation. "High stimulation professions include senior state officials, other specialized directors, production and operations leaders, social science and related specialists, managers and senior corporate executives, and healthcare providers," he explained.

Content created and supplied by: NewsUpdate4 (via Opera News )

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