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African traditional games we used to play but may have forgotten due to technological games

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Online gaming, from Playstations to Nintendos, appears to be "child's play" these days. Many people, though, may recall the days when youngsters gathered on the street to play their favorite games.

They were free and didn't require much in the way of equipment. Apart from being entertaining, they also assisted in the development of vital skills such as social interaction, physical coordination, and even rudimentary math and strategic thinking.

Am sad that today's kids won't be able to play these games since technology games has taken over. Anyway, let's recall on some of the African traditional games we used to play but may have forgotten due to technological games:

Maame ne paapa

Playing with Barbie and Ken dolls in Ghana is a Ghanaian tradition. And it was the one and only time I could get my younger brother to play with my dolls. There were no restrictions; all we had to do was imitate how our parents looked after us on a daily basis. So the dolls are our parents and we are the dolls.

Pilolo

You're playing hide and seek, except this time you're looking for a piece of stick. The player who discovers the shortest piece is eliminated from the game.

Practical Numbers

This game was both entertaining and thrilling. This classic Ghanaian childhood game, which we will never forget, was usually played during recess. It's more of a'mental' exercise than a game. When it's your turn, either say a prime number as quickly as you can or you're out of the game.

Ampe

Even though I couldn't say the word today, Ampe was my front. This time around, the extra pounds may cause me to be handpicked last. This is unquestionably one of our favorite childhood games.

Counters ball

This fascinating game of football, played with bottle tops and deodorant balls, is one I'll never forget from my childhood. Probably because I was the neighborhood's main source of bottle tops. My days as the reigning hood queen are still fresh in my mind.

Kpiting3

You never know how dangerous something may be until you do it for the first time. Pen tops and old Tiger head batteries were used to make a spinning top. Make sure it stands flat after it finishes spinning on your turn, otherwise the back of your hand will pay the price.

This is a game from our childhood that we will never forget. I never understood why putting an empty pen into a pile of sand with a broomstick was entertaining. I'd appreciate it if someone could explain it to me.

Zanzama

Have you ever been hit so hard in the head that you believed your brain might burst through your ears? That's how I felt the first and final time I played a childhood game with my older brother that I'll never forget. I experienced the longest headache in history after forgetting to pronounce the magic word, "Zanzama."

Kyin dan ho (go around the house)

As a gourmand, I'll never forget one of my worst childhood games in Ghana. A perimeter, generally around the house, is established, and you must safeguard your food at all costs.

Because, according to the rules of the game, if you are caught with food by another player, you must complete a journey around the build while the other player tries to devour your food before you do. This was the most heinous game ever!

Do you remember of any? How fun was it at those times? Are technological games fun to play than the African traditional games?

What are your thoughts and say in this?

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Content created and supplied by: barbaraagyeman006 (via Opera News )

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