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6 Most Strange Animal Mating Rituals That You've Never Seen Before

1. Praying Mantis

When the female praying mantis is mating, she does not bite the head off the male with one swift snip: she chomps into it, like an apple. It appears to have the texture of a honeydew melon. females only do eat their mates when food is scarce.


2. Bumble bees

When a male bumblebee mates a queen he will knock her to the ground, climb on her thorax and mates the queen. During mating the queen protrudes her stinger and the male falls back while remaining attached. The two bumble bees can remained attached for several minutes to over an hour.


3. Giraffes

Male giraffes will explore a female's rump and genital area, and if she likes him wink she'll voluntarily produce urine which he'll sniff and taste, to see if she's in estrus.


4. Garden snails

This means that each individual snail of reproductive age is capable of laying eggs. While they are able to self-fertilize, snails will typically choose to mate with a partner, a process that takes four to 12 hours.


Mating happens after the sunset, when the snails are at their peak activity. The slow mating process is completed, the sperm can remain in the snail for up to a year, but usually snails lay eggs within two weeks. Snails are mature enough to start reproducing from one month and a half to 5 years.


5. Grouse

The male Ruffed Grouse uses his wings and a hollow log to perform his impressive mate attraction display. Through a series of increasingly fast wingbeats, the bird creates sudden changes in air pressure that make a rhythmic low-frequency sound.


6. Lion

Both sexes are polygamous and breed throughout the year, but females are usually restricted to the one or two adult males of their pride. In captivity lions often breed every year, but in the wild they usually breed no more than once in two years. 


The male may gently stroke the female with his tongue on the shoulder, neck or back to initiate. Towards the end of copulation, the male may gently bite the back of her neck. During copulation, the female may purr loudly.

Content created and supplied by: Mainooco (via Opera News )

Giraffes Praying Mantis

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