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Moment angry male elephant knocks over massive bull sculpture after mistaking it for love rival

It's a happy moment when an elephant attacks a giant statue in a wildlife park - after being mistaken for a love rival.


Tourists see a male elephant looking for food near a tourist center in Khao Yai National Park, Thailand.

When he looked at the bull, he found a large elephant statue and was confused by the resemblance.


You can see the elephant stare at the artwork for a few minutes before striking the inanimate object and pushing it aside.


One of the model tusks could even be heard when it hit the ground.


The elephant believed that he had won the statue for himself, winning towards the forest, while the rangers looked off into the distance from the park.


It's a happy moment when an elephant attacks a giant statue in a Thai wildlife park - after being mistaken for a love rival


National Park official Ple Srichai said the bull may have mistaken the statue for another man and threatened his right to breed.


He said, “I thought it was funny how the wild elephants tried to attack the statue. Male elephants often fight over females, so he may think that this is the real elephant he needs to show his dominance.


There were also residents who were shocked to witness and shouted when the male Jumbo knocked down the statue. When the elephant left, the police removed the statue.


You can see the elephant stare at the artwork for a few moments before striking the inanimate object and pushing it aside.


The elephant believed that he had won the statue for himself, winning towards the forest, while the rangers looked off into the distance from the park.


No one was reported injured in the incident, and police decided to move the statue to another part of the park to prevent such an attack.


Male Asian elephants roam alone, only joining mating herds. In contrast, male African elephants remain part of the herd throughout their lives.


About 2,000 elephants live in the wild in Thailand and a similar number in captivity where they work at temples, zoos or privately for hire at weddings and festivals.

Content created and supplied by: Kofi004 (via Opera News )

National Park Ple Srichai Thailand

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