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No One Should Blame John Mahama For Imposing Taxes On Ghanaians When He Was In Power – Kweku Annan

Kweku Annan, a self-acclaimed investigative journalist has thrown his support for John Mahama for some of the initiatives he took when in power. The NPP government which is currently in power has been criticized for a number of taxes they have imposed on Ghanaians. latest of all the taxes is the proposed 1.75% tax to be charged on all mobile transactions effective January 2022 should the budget be approved.

According to government communicators, Ghanaians are calling for things to be fixed and thus there is the need for revenue to be raised to develop the country. on ‘The Seat’ tonight, Wednesday, Kweku Annan gave a double blow to former President John Mahama. He praised the former president for finding ways to build the country by raising taxes. He added that every tax that Mahama introduced was to make Ghana better and cautioned all who had criticized or still criticizing him. He noted that this was the same thing the Akufo-Addo government is trying to do.

Kweku Annan then turned around and attacked John Mahama for condemning the government by saying the taxes are huge. According to Kweku Annan, John Mahama is criticizing a policy that he himself used in power. He threatened to expose John Mahama so Ghanaians see the incessant taxes he imposed when in power. He called on the former president to stop playing double standards and inciting Ghanaians against the presidency.

It is interesting to see that Kweku Annan, someone who had always criticized John Mahama will suddenly praise him for imposing taxes. However, the reasons for this compliment is not far-fetched as Kweku later lambasts John Mahama for verbally attacking the government for burdening Ghanaians with enormous taxes.

Content created and supplied by: Still_Unbeatable (via Opera News )

Akufo-Addo John Mahama Kweku Annan Mahama NPP

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