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A Friend In Need Is A Friend Indeed: 7 Best Ways On How To Help A Friend With A Broken Heart

If your friend is dealing with a breakup, the death of a loved one, or any other hard time, you probably want to do whatever you can to help. While there's nothing you can do or say to make the pain go away, you can be there for your friend and offer plenty of support. Regardless of your friend's situation, being a good friend can go a long way in helping heal a broken heart.

Encourage grieving. Your friend needs to deal with their emotions in order to get through this tough time, so encourage them to tackle them head-on. Remind them that they will never feel better if they are in denial about what has happened or ignore how they are feeling about it. Let them know it's okay to cry. Tears can help them heal! If you feel like your friend is bottling their emotions up inside, explain to them that doing so can make it harder to get past the hurt.


Check up on your friend. Heartbreak can stick around for a long time, so don't expect your friend to be fine after a day or 2. Check in on them regularly and ask them how they are feeling. Always remind them that you are there to help and support them however they need. Don't wait for them to reach out to you. They may really need you, but they may not be feeling up to making contact. Call your friend, text them, or leave them a note to let them know you're thinking about them. Depending on how close the 2 of you are, you may want to do this every day or every few days until they seem to be feeling a little better. Call at strategic times to show your friend that you are thinking about them. For example, if a loved one has just passed away, you shouldn't call during the funeral, but it would be nice to call that evening or the next day to see how your friend is doing.


Offer to help out with small things. If your friend is so down in the dumps that they have been neglecting everyday tasks, offer to help them out. For example, bring them some groceries or visit them to help out with math homework. If your friend declines your help, let them know it's an open invitation. If you are close friends, consider surprising them with something unexpected, like having a pizza delivered to their house. Consider inviting them over for a meal. This will help them get the nourishment they need and it will get them out of the house, which will probably be good for them.


Don't push it. While it's great that you want to help your friend, there's only so much you can do. You need to allow your friend to grieve in their own way and give them the time they need to get past their pain. Don't expect them to bounce back right away or try to force them to get over it. Remember that during this time your friend may seem a little selfish and may not be the best friend to you. Try to be understanding and look past this. They will be back to their old selves eventually. Take small steps when encouraging your friend to be active. If they aren't comfortable going to a party, ask them if they want to come over and watch a movie with you.


Tell your friend how strong they are. Your friend might not be feeling very good about themselves right now, so it will help to remind them how incredibly strong and wonderful they are. Tell your friend everything you admire about them and let them know that these qualities are just what they need to get through this tough time. Consider making a list of your friend's best qualities. This may be just what they need to cheer them up.

Be active together. Physical activities can do wonders for the spirit, so try to get your friend moving. Any kind of exercise, whether it's an organized sport or just fooling around, will do them good. Consider inviting them to an exercise class with you. If you can't convince them to do anything too strenuous, see if they will go for a walk with you.


Encourage them to seek professional help. If your friend is having an especially hard time coping with their broken heart, encourage them to talk to a therapist. A professional may be able to offer your friend the kind of support and encouragement that their loved ones simply cannot. This is especially important if your friend feels suicidal or has been engaging in self-destructive behavior like doing drugs or hurting themselves. Your friend needs help, so make sure they get it! A support group may also be an option, depending on what kind of heartbreak your friend is dealing with. This will give them the opportunity to talk to other people who know exactly what they are going through.


Discourage obsessive behavior. Some activities will just make your friend's pain worse, so try to identify destructive habits that get your friend upset and discourage them from doing those things. Let them know how you feel about this and encourage them to stop the behavior. Make sure your friend is not harassing their ex after a breakup. If they keep calling their ex or asking everyone they know about what their ex is doing, let them know that you are concerned. If your friend just lost their job, discourage them from reading (or posting) negative reviews about their former company online.

Content created and supplied by: Undergroundnewsgh (via Opera News )

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