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9 Most Powerful Gangsters Who Ever Lived.

8. Frank Lucas

After Johnson's death, Lucas traveled around and came to the realization that, to be successful, he would have to break the monopoly that the Italian Mafia held in New York. Traveling to Bangkok,Thailand, he eventually made his way to Jack's American Star Bar, an R&R hangout for black soldiers.

 He was later convicted of both federal and New Jersey state drug violations. The following year he was sentenced to 70 years in prison.

8. Griselda Blanco

 The Cocaine Godmother and the Queen of Narco-Trafficking was a Colombian drug lord of the Medellín Cartel and a pioneer in the Miami-based cocaine drug trade and underworld during the 1980s through the early 2000s. It has been estimated that she was responsible for up to 2,000 murders while transporting cocaine from Colombia to New York, Miami and Southern California. She was shot and killed on September 3, 2012, at the age of 69. She became the first ever billionaire female criminal, ruling her multi-billion dollar drug trafficking empire with an iron fist, and becoming one of the deadliest women of all time. Blanco's first husband was Carlos Trujillo. Her second husband was Alberto Bravo. "Blanco, then 32, pulled out a pistol, Bravo responded by producing an Uzi submachine gun and after a blazing gun battle he and six bodyguards lay dead. Blanco, who suffered only a minor gunshot wound to the stomach, recovered and soon afterwards moved to Miami, where her body count and reputation for ruthlessness continued to climb.

7. Anthony Salerno

Anthony was an American mobster who served as underboss and front boss of the Genovese crime family in New York City from 1981 until his conviction in 1986. In 1959, Salerno was a secret financial backer of a heavyweight professional boxing title fight at New York's Yankee Stadium between Swedish boxer Ingemar Johansson and American boxer Floyd Patterson. Salerno kept his headquarters at the Palma Boys Social Club in East Harlem and continued to work in these areas. On April 20, 1978, Salerno was sentenced to six months in federal prison for illegal gambling and tax evasion charges. In early 1981, after his release from prison, Salerno suffered a mild stroke and retreated to his Rhinebeck estate to recuperate. At the time of his stroke, Salerno was Genovese underboss.

6. Carlos Lehder

He is a German-Colombian former drug lord who was co-founder of the Medellín Cartel. He was released from prison in the United States after 33 years in 2020. Lehder eventually ran a cocaine transport empire on Norman's Cay island, 210 miles (340 km) off the Florida coast in the central Bahamas. Lehder started out selling stolen cars and marijuana as well as smuggling stolen cars.To that end, he enlisted his prison bunkmate, former marijuana dealer George Jung as a future partner. Jung had experience flying marijuana to the U.S. from Mexico in small aircraft, staying below radar level, and landing on dry lake beds.

5. Meyer Lansky

Lansky developed a gambling empire that stretched across the world. He was said to own points (percentages) in casinos in Las Vegas, Cuba, the Bahamas and London. Although a member of the Jewish mob, Lansky undoubtedly had strong influence with the Italian-American Mafia and played a large role in the consolidation of the criminal underworld. The full extent of this role has been the subject of some debate, as Lansky himself denied many of the accusations against him. In 1946, Lansky convinced the Italian-American Mafia to place Siegel in charge of Las Vegas, and became a major investor in Siegel's Flamingo Hotel.


4. Amado Carrillo Fuentes

Initially, Carrillo was part of the Guadalajara Cartel, sent to Ojinaga, Chihuahua to oversee the cocaine shipments of his uncle, Ernesto Fonseca Carrillo ("Don Neto"), and to learn about border operations from Pablo Acosta Villarreal ("El Zorro de Ojinaga"; "The Ojinaga Fox") and Rafael Aguilar Guajardo. Later, Carrillo worked with Pablo Escobar and the Cali Cartel smuggling drugs from Colombia to Mexico and the United States. He also worked with "El Chapo" (Joaquin Guzman Loera), the Arellano Felix family, and the Beltran Leyva organization.

During his tenure, Carrillo reportedly built a multibillion-dollar drug empire. It was estimated that he may have made over $25 billion in revenue over the course of his career. He died in July 1997, in a Mexican hospital, after undergoing extensive plastic surgery to change his appearance. In his final days, Carrillo was being tracked by Mexican and U.S. authorities.

3. Joaquin Guzman Loera

Guzman commonly known as "El Chapo" is a Mexican drug lord and former leader of the Sinaloa Cartel, an international crime syndicate. Guzmán was first captured in 1993 in Guatemala and was extradited and sentenced to 20 years in prison in Mexico for murder and drug trafficking. He bribed prison guards and escaped from a federal maximum-security prison in 2001. His status as a fugitive resulted in an $8.8 million combined reward from Mexico and the U.S. for information leading to his capture, and he was arrested in Mexico in 2014. He escaped prior to formal sentencing in 2015, through a tunnel under his jail cell. Mexican authorities recaptured him following a shoot-out in 2016 and extradited him to the U.S. a year later. In 2019, he was found guilty of a number of criminal charges related to his leadership of the Sinaloa Cartel, and is currently serving a life sentence at ADX Florence.

2. AL Capone

Capone joined the Five Points Gang as a teenager and became a bouncer in organized crime premises such as brothels. In his early twenties, he moved to Chicago and became a bodyguard and trusted factotum for Johnny Torrio, head of a criminal syndicate that illegally supplied alcohol.Torrio went into retirement after North Side gunmen almost killed him. A very sickly Capone left Baltimore on March 20, 1940, after a few weeks of inpatient and outpatient care, for Palm Island, Florida. In 1942, after mass production of penicillin was started in the United States, Capone was one of the first American patients treated by the new drug.

1. Pablo Escobar

Pablo was a Colombian most powerful gangster and narcoterrorist who was the founder and sole leader of the Medellín Cartel. He was addressed by many as "The King of Cocaine," Escobar is the wealthiest criminal in history, having amassed an estimated net worth of US$30 billion by the time of his death equivalent to $59 billion as of 2019. He was also involved in motor vehicle theft, selling of fake lottery tickets, kidnapping, murdering of police officers and holding peoples into ransom. Sixteen months after his escape from La Catedral, Pablo Escobar died in a shootout on 2 December 1993.

Theseare the most notorious who ever lived in the world history.

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